Tax Policy on the Table for September

Tax Policy on the Table for September

Members of Congress are back home and set to return mid-September for a final three week session before the November elections. Add in two or three weeks of possible “lame duck” session, and that’s the extent of time available to tax writers to address the numerous items on their honey-do list:

  • Preventing the 2011 tax hikes (including AMT);
  • Adopting the small business tax bill;
  • Extending the extenders that expired last year;
  • Extending the extenders that will expire this year; and
  • Something on the estate tax.

Given that these issues have been before Congress the entire year, it’s difficult to conceive how Congress would suddenly jump into action on all these items before the clock runs out. And while recent statements by leadership suggest they will make a concerted effort to address most of these items before adjourning for good, the Senate continues to be hamstrung in its ability to move anything. Here’s our take on the where we go from here:

  • Small Business Tax Bill: The bill itself is non-controversial and has bipartisan support. What’s holding it up is a fight over the process — will amendments be allowed and, if so, how many — and on-going debates over extraneous tax items like the future of the estate tax. Majority Leader Reid was very close to a deal with  Minority Leader McConnell just prior to the break. We expect further progress and ultimate adoption of this package in September.
  • Tax Hikes: Last week, Finance Committee Republicans issued a statement calling on the Committee to hold a markup on extending current rates “as soon as possible to bring certainty of continued tax relief.” Meanwhile, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer is calling for extending only those provisions for taxpayers making less than $200,000. And several Senate Democrats — notably Senators Kent Conrad (D-ND) and Evan Bayh (D-IN) — have expressed support for a one-year extension of everything. No clear path out of this challenge, but we continue to believe a one-year extension of everything is most likely, followed by failure of Congress to pass anything. A one year extension of the middle-class relief is a close third.
  • Extenders: Extenders will likely move as part of the small business tax bill in September, which is good news for manufacturers and families living in states with no state income tax. The bad news is the extension would last just until the end of this year, so another bill would have to follow soon.
  • Estate Tax: We’re now four months away from seeing the estate tax rise from the dead (55 percent top rate and $1 million exemption) with no apparent solution in view. Senators Jon Kyl (R-AZ) and Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) are pressing for lower rates and a higher exemption (35 percent and $5 million) while others support adopting the rules in place in 2009 (45 percent and $3.5 million). Still a third camp is happy to see the estate tax return in full force. Time is short, and no side appears to have the 60 votes necessary to prevail, which means current law has the upper hand.

Regarding the floor situation, Senate Majority Leader Reid set up the small business bill to be pending business as soon as they get back on September 13th. He introduced yet another substitute before they left and filled the amendment tree to block other amendments. He then filed cloture on several democratic amendments to the bill as well as the underlying legislation, setting up a series of 60-vote threshold cloture votes in the first couple days when they return.

While it’s possible these votes take place and fail along party lines, it’s more likely the two leaders come to an agreement on allowing a limited number of amendments — including adding the extender package to the mix - for the bill to move forward. At least that’s what we hope, since there are some very good provisions in the small business bill that should help investment and job creation.

Regarding the other items, including Extenders v. 2011, we’re expecting the rest of the to-do list to get pushed into a lame duck, with some sort of omnibus bill that includes federal funding and tax provisions presented to members in November or December. No idea how that battle royale turns out, but we’ll be sitting in the front row to watch.

More on S Corporations and Employment

The ongoing battle over the pending tax hikes has a tendency to devolve into a debate over the definition of “small” business and other random characteristics a firm needs before it be considered “real” by some policymakers. For example, proponents of the tax hike appear to believe a manufacturer is more “real” than a law firm, even though both are taxed as flow-through entities and both might be defined by the SBA as small.

But this debate over which types of business activity are “real” is silly and misses the point. The point is that a large percentage of the pending tax hike will be imposed on employers and investment. One half of all business income is taxed at the individual tax rates. One quarter to one-third of all business income is subject to the top two rates. That’s a lot of economic activity subject to the pending tax hikes.

Consider this debate from the perspective of the employee: whether your job comes from a large S corporation or a small S corporation makes no difference to you; both are employers, and your job is your job. So why should policymakers care whether you work at a 500 employee manufacturing plant or a 12 person law firm? Why do some policymakers believe one job worth saving but the other not?

One challenge we face in this debate is that while the folks at the Statistics of Income break down firms by structure, they don’t include employment numbers, so it’s difficult to tell how many employees work for S corporations. One way to back out an estimate is to look at their payroll and executive compensation numbers. If we assume the average compensation of an American worker is $40,000 (admittedly a rough estimate) then it appears S corporations employed about 21 million workers back in 2007.

Moreover, S corporation employment gets bigger the more revenue and income a firm makes (as you’d expect). Firms with more than $50 million in revenues employed about 4.5 million workers, while firms with $10 to $50 million in revenues employed 4.4 million workers.

Firms that size have average business income per shareholder exceeding $335,000, which means more often than not, their business income is taxed at the top two rates. Are the nine million employees who work at these firms less deserving than the employees who work at the local coffee shop? Obviously not, but for some reason the other side of this debate spends an enormous amount of time trying to minimize the value of those employees and the firms they work for.

Again, these numbers are just rough estimates, but the point they make is valid nonetheless: flow-through businesses — including S corporations — represent the majority of employers in this country and raising their taxes is not going to help the economy or the job picture.

Joint Committee Estimates Tax Hikes

In response to a request from the Ways and Means Committee, the Joint Committee on Taxation released some estimates last week on who would benefit from foregoing the rate hikes and other tax increases next year. You may have seen related stories focusing on how much “millionaires” would benefit. A couple thoughts:

First, while the JCT estimates that taxpayers earning over $1 million would see an average tax break of $103,834, they also estimated this break would reduce their tax burden by only 11 percent, suggesting that these taxpayers will pay nearly $1 million in income taxes next year on average.

Second, the revenue “cost” of avoiding all the tax hikes next year is not substantially more than the cost of avoiding those for taxpayers making less than $200,000 — $227 billion versus $202 billion.

That’s not as much as we would have expected, and in our view raises the odds that Congress extends for one year all the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts. It’s not a done deal, of course, and total inaction by Congress is also possible, but with the weak job market and pending elections, the legislative equivalent of a punt — a one year extension of everything — is looking increasingly likely.

2019-02-04T15:47:04+00:00