Tax Reform Statement & Pass Through Taxes

Just in time for the August recess, the House, Senate and the White House released a joint statement yesterday on the status of their tax reform talks and their plans moving forward.  You can read the statement here.  From our perspective, here are the key points:
“While we have debated the pro-growth benefits of border adjustability, we appreciate that there are many unknowns associated with it and have decided to set this policy aside in order to advance tax reform.”
A primary purpose of the statement was to pivot the tax conversation away from the House Blueprint and the border adjustment tax (BAT).  The BAT was controversial from day one, but it also was proving to be an obstacle towards getting a budget resolution enacted in early September.  The leaders of the House Freedom Caucus had stated they would oppose the budget resolution without a promise that the BAT was off the table.  No budget resolution, no tax reform, so the BAT had to go.
Will it work?  Unclear.  Freedom Caucus Chair Mark Meadows (R-NC) was quoted this morning as saying that taking BAT off the table was nice, but they want clarity on the rest of the tax package before they would support the budget.  That sequence of details first, process second is the reverse of how congressional budgeting is supposed to work, and is an indication of just how difficult it will be to get the Freedom Caucus on board with any plan in September.
“The goal is a plan that reduces tax rates as much as possible, allows unprecedented capital expensing, places a priority on permanence, and creates a system that encourages American companies to bring back jobs and profits trapped overseas. And we are now confident that, without transitioning to a new domestic consumption-based tax system, there is a viable approach for ensuring a level playing field between American and foreign companies and workers, while protecting American jobs and the U.S. tax base.”   
The underlined lines, coupled with the demise of the BAT, indicate the negotiators are also moving away from full expensing and towards more limited capital cost recovery improvements, such as permanent bonus depreciation and faster depreciation schedules.  Full expensing was a predicate for the BAT and a cash-flow tax system, but it faced its own challenges.  It was expensive, it was paired with the controversial provision to disallow deductions of net interest, and it was received by the corporate community with a giant yawn.
“The goal is a plan that reduces tax rates as much as possible, allows unprecedented capital expensing, places a priority on permanence, and creates a system that encourages American companies to bring back jobs and profits trapped overseas.”
Temporary tax cuts are out and repatriation and territorial are in.  Both of these items are significant concessions by the Trump Administration, which had in the past made the case for temporary rate cuts and only lately embraced moving towards a territorial system.  The Blueprint relied on the BAT to enforce its territorial tax approach.  Now that it’s out, expect the tax writers to spend lots of time crafting more complicated “Camp Option C”-type rules to crack down on base erosion under a new territorial regime.
 “We also believe there should be a lower tax rate for small businesses so they can compete with larger ones, and lower rates for all American businesses so they can compete with foreign ones.”
This careful construction suggests that the tax negotiators have agreed to reduce rates for C corporations and pass through businesses alike (yea!) but have not settled on any other details, including whether the business provisions should be a tax cut or not.  Compare that language with the very specific “agreement that tax relief for American families should be at the heart of our plan.”  Meanwhile, White House advisor Steve Bannon has been busy selling a tax hike on high income earners.  As Bloomberg reports this morning:
“White House chief strategist Steve Bannon’s plan to raise the top income-tax rate for America’s highest earners could find some support among congressional Republicans as part of a populist message to sell a broader tax overhaul, according to one conservative lawmaker who has heard the proposal…. Automatic opposition isn’t a given among some GOP members, said the lawmaker who heard the proposal – especially if they’re made to understand how it could help publicly sell a plan that would include other changes to the tax code,” the lawmaker said.
These reports should act as a wake-up call for the Main Street community.  The Big Six (McConnell, Hatch, Ryan, Brady, Mnuchin, and Cohn) may have agreed that tax rates on all businesses should come down, but how that agreement squares with calls to raise rates on high income individuals, the majority of whom are business owners, is anybody’s guess.
So to sum up then, yesterday’s joint statement includes specific steps to advance the tax reform effort this fall.  Its call for ending the BAT and for considering tax reform under regular order are direct responses to criticisms that threatened to derail House consideration.  And the significance of all three actors – the House, Senate, and Administration – coming together to craft a joint statement should not be lost among the details either.  It is a commitment to get something done by the leaders of the government and should be taken seriously.
On the other hand, the brevity of the statement coupled with the Administration’s continued message muddle makes clear there’s lots of negotiating to come and many, many details to fill in.  As we have discussed in the past, those details are important – they could spell the difference between a tax package that treats Main Street fairly, and one that leaves it behind.  For that reason, we will be on the Hill pressing our case for fair treatment of all private businesses and the communities they serve.

S Corp Provisions on House Floor

Last Friday, longtime S-CORP allies Rep. Dave Reichert (R-WA) and Rep. Ron Kind (D-WI) introduced two pieces of legislation – H.R. 629 and H.R. 630 – to extend tax provisions critical to America’s 4.6 million S corporations.

The bills would make permanent the five-year built-in gains holding period as well as a basis adjustment fix for S corporations making charitable contributions.  They build off the momentum from last Congress when identical bills successfully passed the House with broad bipartisan support. These provisions are ones that we’ve championed for years, and go a long way towards making the tax rules for Main Street businesses fair and predictable.

In a joint press release, Rep. Reichert had this to say:

S Corporations are proven job creators and it is our job as legislators to make sure the tax code helps them to access the capital they need to grow, remain competitive and help get Americans back to work. I am pleased to introduce these bipartisan pieces of legislation with my colleague Congressman Kind, because our tax code should encourage growth rather than stifle it. I look forward to working with my colleagues to advance policies that help our small businesses create jobs and support families across the country.

Rep. Kind also added:

These commonsense, bipartisan bills will bring stability and simplicity to the tax code to make it easier for many small businesses to create good jobs and help sustain local communities. There are nearly 60,000 S Corporations in Wisconsin alone, so supporting these job creators is a top priority as we work to strengthen the economy in Wisconsin and across the country.

The broad support these provisions have garnered from the business community and lawmakers reflects the sentiment that these outdated tax rules just don’t make sense and permanent changes need to be made. H.R. 629 would allow S corps increased access to their own capital by providing for a permanent, five-year BIG holding period, rather than the current ten-year period these businesses must endure before they can dispose of appreciated assets without paying a prohibitive tax.  As S-Corp Advisor Jim Redpath testified before the Ways and Means Committee last year:

I find the BIG tax provision causes many S corporations to hold onto unproductive or old assets that should be replaced. Ten years is a long time and certainly not cognizant of current business-planning cycles. Many times I have experienced changes in the business environment or the economy which prompted S corporations to need access to their own capital, that if taken would trigger this prohibitive tax. This results in business owners not making the appropriate decision for the business and its stakeholders, simply because of the BIG tax.

H.R. 630 is another common sense reform that would encourage S corporations to give back by permanently ensuring S corporations are able to deduct the full value of the stock they donate to charity.  This provision would level out the tax treatment of such donations between S corporations and partnerships.

Improving and making permanent the rules for the businesses that drive our economy is critical and we applaud Reps. Reichert and Kind for once again introducing this legislation.  We are looking forward to seeing the bills considered and adopted by the House!

Extenders Clear the Senate

Although it’s not ideal and expires in just two weeks, we are glad to report that the tax extenders bill finally passed in the Senate last night by a 76-16 vote and is on its way to the President’s desk.

Among the 55 provisions included in the bill are the reduced five-year built-in gains holding period and the basis adjustment fix for charitable contributions. The package, however, is a one year retroactive extension of the expired provisions through 2014, and will therefore expire at year’s end.

Interestingly, Senate Finance Chairman Ron Wyden (D-OR) voted against the bill, as did Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), highlighting the ridiculous nature of a one-year retroactive extension for tax policy. (The 16 “no” votes were a bipartisan affair: 8 members of each party opposed the bill.) Speaking last night, Chairman Wyden said:

“This tax bill doesn’t have the shelf life of a carton of eggs…the only new effects of this legislation apply to the next two weeks.”

Sen. Portman also took to the floor to vent his frustration:

“This is ridiculous because we’re not extending it beyond the tax year and by the time we get back here, it will already be expired for a week or two…it is a failure of Washington again to get its act together and do what should be done.”

That said, we are pleased our S-CORP provisions were included in the package and expect to pick up again next year, as the tax policy conversation will have an early start. Congress is now adjourned for the holidays and will start up again January 6th.

Our thanks go out to all our S-CORP champions, both on and off the Hill, for your continued commitment to the Main Street business cause. We hope that you have very happy holidays and we look forward to our work together in 2015!

 

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